C.B. Cosgrove, Jr.

View products that support dmairfield.org

BACKGROUND

Burt Cosgrove was the manager of the Davis-Monthan Airfield from 1928 to 1932. As well, he was a pilot and airplane owner, and a competent amateur photographer. This collection of images comes from his Leica camera that he kept handy at the Airfield during his tenure.

The Cornelius Burton Cosgrove, Jr. Collection is important to understanding the role the Davis-Monthan Airfield played in civil, commercial and military aviation during the Golden Age. It gives us almost a day-to-day "movie" of the comings and goings of the people and airplanes of the era. It provides significant insight into the humanity and pioneering spirit of the people who give us the art and science of aviation here in the 21st century.

The images of the Collection are presented without touch up or modification, except for squaring margins, sizing and optimizing for web download. Unless otherwise indicated, they were scanned at 200dpi, using a Hewlett-Packard 4370 scanner.

Where some images may have interesting details viewed better at higher resolution, the scans were made at a higher dpi (300-1200dpi depending on details). These higher-resolution images are made available as PDF files, downloadable ad lib, so as not to slow display rates for the main pages.

The images are displayed without much technical commentary. Rather, the links will take you to further information, where available.

Take time to examine these important records of the Golden Age of Aviation. Enjoy everything!

OTHER REFERENCES

Your copy of the Davis-Monthan Airfield Register with all the pilots' signatures and helpful cross-references to pilots and their aircraft is available here. Or use this FORM to order a copy signed by the author.

OTHER RESOURCES

This link leads you to a book that describes and illustrates with black & white photographs the majority of military aircraft that landed at the Davis-Monthan Airfield between 1925 and 1936. The book includes biographies of some of the pilots who flew the aircraft to Tucson as well as extensive listings of all the pilots and airplanes. Or use this FORM to order a copy signed by the author.

---o0o---

Allen, Richard S. 1988. Revolution in the Sky: The Lockheeds of Aviation's Golden Age. Orion Books, NY. 253 pp.

Forden, Lesley. 1986. Glory Gamblers: The Story of the Dole Race. Nottingham Press. Alameda, CA. 194 pp. ISBN: 0-913958-03-04. Link.

 
Davis-Monthan Aviation Field Register
CulturalMotion PicturesFriendsNon Profit statusProducts and services
ReferencesPublicationsCollectionsGuest EditorsPress Coverage

THE C. BURTON COSGROVE, JR.

PHOTOGRAPH AND DOCUMENT COLLECTION

Image Grouping ID: Aircraft

 

This section of the Cosgrove Collection consists of 92 images of aircraft. Click the links to view 16 images of MILITARY AIRCRAFT, or to view 76 images of CIVIL AIRCRAFT.

All the airplanes shown, except as noted, are logged in the Davis-Monthan Airfield Register. The images may or may not have been taken at Tucson, or by Cosgrove, but they were cataloged in his collections. In many cases I have no other images of these airplanes.

Where I provide airplane numbers, they were clearly readable on the original photos when I scanned them (some required a magnifying glass). I apologize that they may not be easily readable by you on the lower-resolution images here on the Web site.

Hyperlinks are provided where additional information is available on this website and elsewhere. If you have additional information about any of these airplanes, or their pilots, please use this FORM to contact me.

---o0o---

MILITARY AIRCRAFT

This point begins a series of photos of 16 military aircraft from the Cosgrove Collection that are signed in to the Davis-Monthan Airfield Register.

Below, a handsome trio of Curtiss F6C-1 Hawks. In the original image, the registration number of the near airplane is readable as A-6972 (which is a F6C-3; see the link). This airplane landed at Tucson on March 24, 1928 flown by Capt. Harold D. Campbell. He was eastbound on a cross-country flight from San Diego, CA to Quantico, VA. The other airplanes are unidentified.

Interestingly, a search for "2-F-1" in the Register database reveals that squadron identification belongs to a Boeing F3B-1 that landed on 4/6/1929. The Curtiss aircraft were phased out over the preceeding year, and the Boeing was reassigned the old squadron number. Equally as interesting is the fact that six sister Boeings "2-F-4", along with 2-F-10, 11, 12, 15 and 18, landed at Tucson April 6, 1929 as a group. They must have made a wonderful noise.

Trio of Curtiss F6C-1 Hawks
Trio of Curtiss F6C-1 Hawks

Below, Burt Cosgrove, Jr. shaking hands with a gentleman, probably the new owner of the Travel Air aircraft behind them. Cosgrove was a Travel Air distributor for a period of time during the late 1920s.

But this is not the subject of this image. The subject is 2-F-18, visible only as the aft fuselage at left (see above). This airplane, identified as a Boeing F3B-1 in the Register, was flown to Tucson by P.M. Nold on April 6, 1929. We may reasonably guess that this picture was taken near that date at Tucson.

A history of VF-2, with which the airplanes in this and the image above were based, is available at this link. The history corroborates and describes the change of airplanes from Hawks to Boeings.

2-F-18
2-F-18

Below, the Douglas O-2H 27-289. This airplane was flown to Tucson on 1/30/1928 by Major Millard F. Harmon.

Douglas 27-289
Douglas 27-289

Below, C.B. Cosgrove, Jr. at Tucson standing with Douglas O-2H 28-165 on September 30, 1930. This airplane landed at Tucson and is recorded in the Register four times between 1928 and 1931. It was flown to Tucson three times by T.V. Foster, a good friend of Cosgrove. The last image at the link shows Foster standing in front of this airplane in 1931.

C.B. Cosgrove and Douglas 28-165

Below, AAC 29-355 is identified in the Register as a Boeing P-12. This airplane landed at Tucson twice, on April 20, 1929 and May 10, 1929. Each time it was flown by Capt. Hugh Elmendorf. Elmendorf was killed in a crash in 1933. While at first glance the tail skid appears to be suspended in air, it actually rests on a block. An identical photograph, from a different source, is on the airplane's page.

Boeing P-12 29-355 flown by Hugh Elmendorf
29-355

Below, one of 43 landings made at Tucson by Keystone bombers. This airplane, a model Y1B-4, 30-344, landed once on 8/29/1933, piloted by Capt. W.S. Jones.

30-344 Keystone Bomber
Keystone Bomber

Below, another image of 30-344.

30-344 Keystone Bomber Y1B-4
30-344 Keystone Bomber

Below, Fokker 31-388, model Y1C-14. This airplane landed at Tucson four times between 4/7/1931 and 1/20/1933 flown by two different pilots.

Fokker 31-388
Fokker 31-388

Below, de Havilland A-6369 aloft over San Diego, CA. This airplane visited Tuscon from San Diego piloted by Capt. F.P. Mulcahy on 8/23/1926. He remained overnight and departed eastbound to El Paso, TX.

Post-WWI de Havilland A-6369
A-6369

Below, Boeing PW-9, A-6889, flown to Tucson on 12/14/1926 by James T. Moore. Capt. Moore was on a cross-country trip from San Diego, CA to Quantico, VA. He remained overnight at Tucson. His signature is on page 14 of the Register.

James T. Moore's Boeing PW-9, A-6889
A-6889

Below, th Army Fokker C-2 trimotor transport, 26-202, specially outfitted, strengthened and equipped for a flight from the U.S. west coast to Hawaii. Named the "Bird of Paradise" It landed at Tucson June 20, 1927 piloted by Lester Maitland and Albert Hegenberger. See the links for details of the airplane, the trans-Pacific flight and of the lives of the pilots.

Army Transpacific Fokker, 26-202
Army

The airship USS Shenandoah flew over Tucson early on October 10, 1924. Cosgrove took these pictures as it made its way to the west coast. It did not land at Tucson, and its passage precedes the Register by about a year. The Shenandoah was based at Scott Field, St. Louis, MO.

Airship USS Shenandoah
Shenandoah

Below, one of the messages (spelling aside) conveyed to the pilots and crew of the "Question Mark". The "Quesion Mark", Fokker C-2, 28-120, visited Tucson with all personnel of the record refueled endurance flight which they had just completed on the west coast. Major Carl Spatz was the commander of the flight. Please see his link to learn more about him and the endurance record.

"Question Mark" Message, January, 1929
"Question Mark" Message, January, 1929

Below, a military Northrop Alpha. Two military Y1C-19 Alphas landed at Tucson. An unidentified one landed on Saturday, May 9, 1931, and on Thursday May 21, 1931, another identified as 31-517.

The location of this image is not Tucson. Although the rudder is painted in military markings, it carries no USAAC serial number yet. So this might be right after the plane was built, which may make the location Union Air Terminal where the Northrop plant was located. Note the sepia color this image has taken on over the years, and the decorative border on the image as it came from the photo developer/printer.

Military Northrop Alpha
Lockheed

Back to top.

---o0o---

CIVIL AIRCRAFT

Below are 76 images of civil aircraft that are signed into the Davis-Monthan Airfield Register. Not all were taken at Tucson, but many were. Dates and locations are cited when known, and links made to additional information about the aircraft and their pilots available on this website.

This Aeromarine-Klemm, below, landed 7/7/1929 flown by Daniel E. Ellis. He carried his wife as passenger. Based in Keyport, NJ, they were on their way northwest from Pecos, TX to Phoenix, AZ. From the date of arrival and the date of the image, this airplane was being flown fresh from the factory.

Aeromarine 120H
Aeromarine 120H

Ellis was followed to Tucson the next day by F.K. Koenig-Warthausen (flying eastbound), who was flying a similar airplane, a Klemm-Daimler. This airplane was built in Germany, whereas the other ten landings by Aeromarines were by airplanes made under license in New Jersey. Don't let the frail look of the airplane fool you. Follow the Koenig-Warthausen link to see his plane that he flew around the world.

Not all the airplanes that arrived at Tucson left. Below is an example of one. It is a Mohawk MLV Pinto, registration number 395. It was flown to the Airfield on 1/14/1929 by H.W. Sheridan carrying his wife as passenger. Follow the link to learn about the airplane and the circumstances around the following three images. Images presented without comment, except to say it is not good to wind up in the headlights of a car on a cold January night.

Mohawk MVL Pinto 395 1/14/1929
Mohawk MVL Pinto 395

 

Mohawk MVL Pinto 395 1/14/1929
Mohawk MVL Pinto 395

 

Mohawk MVL Pinto 395 1/14/1929
Mohawk MVL Pinto 395

Below the Buhl LA-1 "Bull Pup" 8461. It landed at Tucson on 2/1/1931, piloted by Roger M. Batchelder. He was westbound from El Paso, TX to Spokane, WA. Follow the link to learn more about this airplane.

Buhl LA-1 "Bull Pup" 8461 at Tucson 2/1/1931
Buhl LA-1 "Bull Pup" 8461

Below, another view of the "Bull Pup" at Tucson.

Buhl LA-1 "Bull Pup" 8461 at Tucson 2/1/1931
Buhl LA-1 "Bull Pup" 8461 at Tucson 2/1/1931

Below, Stinson SM-1 Detroiter NR5189 "City of Chicago" and NR5326 flown to Tucson on 7/20/1930 as part of the Hunter Brothers entourage. Please click this link for more information and images on this site.

Stinson SM-1 Detroiter NR5189 "City of Chicago"
Stinson SM-1 Detroiter NR5189

"Big Ben" was the refueling plane for the Hunter Brothers' 553 hour record air-to-air refueled endurance flight completed July 4, 1930. See the links (and just below) for further information about this famous airplane.

Stinson SM-1 Detroiter, NR5326, "Big Ben"
"Big Ben"

Below, data written on the back of the image above. The writing was enhanced with PhotoShop to improve the contrast for readability.

Data, Hunter Brothers Endurance Flight, June-July 1930
data

Below, three photographs of Stinson SM-1 Detroiter NR5189 "City of Chicago" and "Big Ben" on the ground at Tucson. These images are as they appear on one page of Cosgrove's album.

Stinson SM-1 Detroiters "Big Ben" and "City of Chicago", Tucson, AZ, ca. July 20, 1930
"City of Chicago"

Below, "City of Chicago".

"City of Chicago"
"City of Chicago"

Below, the interior of an unidentified (but it is similar to NC898E, the first Executive) Lockheed Vega. Please direct your browser to the link to see the interior of NC898E as of April, 2008. This is the Executive model (note the lavatory at rear). Leather seats (one folded forward), curtained windows (not installed here), a folding desk with typewriter, and braid handles were part of the Executive "package". This individual seems to lack the curtains. This image (although somewhat cropped), as well as one taken forward from the same position, can be found on page 160 of the Allen reference in the left sidebar.

Lockheed Vega Interior
Lockheed Vega Interior

Two Douglas DC-2 and one DC-3 aircraft landed between 2/3/1935 and 10/11/36. Below is an image of the interior of an unidentified TWA DC-2 taken on June 21, 1934 about a month after the DC-2 had its first flight ever.

Note the window curtains, antimacassars, air vents and overhead hatracks. The luncheon of broth, finger sandwiches, salad and coffee is served on real china with real silverware, on a tablecloth! Note, too, that the seats rotate to allow one to face a partner or colleague. Among Davis-Monthan Airfield pilots who went on to fly the DC-2 were Robert Buck, Paul Richter and Jack Frye, all TWA personnel.

Douglas DC-2 Transport Interior, June 21, 1934
Douglas DC-2 Transport Interior

Below is a modern technical comparison of the two Douglas models.

DC-2/DC-3 Technical Comparison
DC-2/DC-3 Technical Comparison

Below, Northrop Alpha NC11Y.

Northrop Alpha NC11Y
Northrop Alpha NC11Y

Below, Lockheed Sirius NC13W poses with Burt Cosgrove, Jr. in Tucson, sometime in 1930 or so. However, compare this image with this one. It doesn't take much imagination to believe the image below was taken on the same day as the one at the link of Cosgrove and Dewey Simpson. The airplane is in the right position, between the buildings, and Cosgrove is wearing the same clothes, including the hat, knickers and argyles. We might also conjecture, based on shadows, that this picture was taken just a little earlier than the one at the link, on a sunny day circa 1930-31.

Lockheed Sirius NC13W
Lockheed Sirius NC13W

Below, three images of Boeing Model 95 NC192E taken on the ground at Tucson. It landed on 3/19/1929.

Boeing Model 95 NC192E
Boeing Model 95 NC192E

Below we find Gladys O'Donnell in Waco NC21M, race number 7. She won the 1930 Women's Class A Pacific Derby between Long Beach, CA and Chicago, IL in this red and yellow airplane. It is fairly clear this image was taken sometime during the 1930 race (note flagger), it is not clear if it was taken at Tucson. Although Tucson was a "control stop" during the race, no racers signed the Register. In fact no one signed the Register on the 19th of August when the competitors passed through Tucson.

Pilot O'Donnell was a Charter member of Ninety-nines and a participant in the August, 1929 Powder Puff Derby. She placed second in that race. This airplane landed at Tucson once on 5/24/1931, not in conjunction with any race.

Waco 10, NC21M
Waco NC21M

Below, Monocoupe NC518W flown to Tucson twice by Phoebe Fairgrave Omlie. The gentleman standing by the airplane is unidentified. The date is probably sometime during cold months, as he is wearing gloves.

Monocoupe NC518W
Monocoupe NC518W

Below, Lockheed Vega NC625E.

Lockheed Vega Model 5, NC625E
Lockheed Vega NC625E

Below, Stearman NC784H. This airplane landed twice at Tucson.

Stearman NC784H
NC784H

Below, Fokker F10-A, NC800E. This airplane landed once at Tucson on 12/16/1931. Below we see it ready to load six passengers. See the link for further discussion about this airplane on the ground at Tucson.

Fokker F10-A, NC800E
NC800E

Below, NC800E loaded, step stool removed, and ready to taxi.

Fokker F10-A, NC800E

Below, Pitcairn NC96W which landed once at Tucson on August 3, 1930. The pilot was M.E. Grevemberg and passenger Margery Doig, herself a competent pilot and charter member of the 99s. Please direct your browser to their biography pages to learn about the possibility that Doig may have been flying the airplane.

Pitcairn NC96W, M.E. Grevemberg & Margery Doig
Pitcairn NC96W

Another image of pilot and passenger. They were westbound to Los Angeles, CA, so that Margery could compete in the 1930 Women's Class A Pacific Derby between Long Beach, CA and Chicago, IL. She, unfortunately, was forced out of the race at Emporia, Kansas by an engine fire. Grevemberg competed in Event 22, the Men's 800 cu.in. five mile course. He placed 4th out of the money. Both of them flew Pitcairn aircraft (with J-6 engine) in their events. Although it seems probable, I don't know if either of them flew this airplane. Does anyone KNOW?

Pitcairn NC96W, M.E. Grevemberg & Margery Doig
Pitcairn NC96W

Below, NC1102 landed twice at Tucson, on 9/15/1928 flown by John Collings, and on 11/6/1928 flown by Eddie Bellande. The location and date of the image are unknown. Please see the links to learn about the interesting history of this airplane and its pilots. Look at this link to read a wonderfully bawdy and humorous letter mailed to Collings by a fellow transport pilot.

Ford Trimotor NC1102
NC1102

Below, Fairchild NC1620 flown to Tucson 2/2/1928 by C.W. "Bill" Gilpin. The date and location of this image are unknown, but probability is high that it is over Tucson in the late 1920s.

Fairchild NC1620
Fairchild NC1620

Below, Ryan (modified) NC2341. This airplane was owned by C.B. Cosgrove, Jr. and Jack Loess. Notations along with this image state it was taken during the spring of 1927 at San Diego, CA, and C.B. Cosgrove is in the cockpit.

Ryan (modified) NC2341
Ryan (modified) NC2341

Below, data from the back of the image above.

Ryan (modified) NC2341 data
Ryan (modified) NC2341 data

Below, another view of NC2341.

Ryan (modified) NC2341

Below, Curtiss Pusher (replica) NC3378 flown to Tucson by Al Wilson on 9/28/1930. If we believe the Register, then the caption has the day and date wrong by over a year. Perhaps he landed another time and did not sign the Register. Wilson stands next to the airplane. See additional images of Wilson here on this site.

Curtiss Pusher (replica) NC3378
Curtiss Pusher (replica) NC3378

Below, four images of Alexander Eaglerock NC3786 after a crash in the desert near Tucson. These images are undated, but a little detective work gets us in the ballpark of when this accident occurred, and who might have been the pilot. If you refer to the link you'll find out the airplane first came to Tucson during the spring and summer of 1928. It was owned by G.E. Deal, a local pilot.

Alexander Eaglerock NC3786
Alexander Eaglerock NC3786

The left wing tangled with a tough mesquite.

Alexander Eaglerock NC3786
Alexander Eaglerock NC3786

Clearly, below, the left wing is severely damaged. Pilot Deal had repairs performed to the lower left wing spar that were recorded in the airplane's official chain of custody on 8/1/1928. From these images, it seems strange that repairs weren't performed on the upper wing spar, too.

Alexander Eaglerock NC3786
Alexander Eaglerock NC3786

Repairs were made and the airplane sold in early 1930 to Al Hudgin. He sold it a year later and it was destroyed in another accident, probably in early 1931.

Alexander Eaglerock NC3786
Alexander Eaglerock NC3786

Below, Travel Air 2000 NC4533. C.B. Cosgrove, Jr. is at left. Please review this airplane and the other people at the link.

Travel Air 2000 NC4533
Travel Air 2000 NC4533

Below, Waco GXE NX3132. This airplane, and nine more immediately below, were photographed at Ryan Airport, San Diego, CA. The date is undoubtedly July 11, 1928, the day after they visited Tucson during the 1928 Ford Reliability Tour. Refer to the Forden reference in the left sidebar for a comprehensive story about all the Ford Reliability Tours.

NX3132 was flown during the Tour by M.G. "Dan" Beard. He wrote in the Remarks column of the Register, "Ate your dust, back for more". The aircraft is S/N 805, manufactured in1927, and is the prototype for the Fairchild Caminiz engine, which can be seen here swinging a huge wood propeller.

Waco 10 NX3132
Waco 10 NX3132

Below, Bellanca 4050 in the livery of Schlee-Brock Aircraft Corp. This airplane landed at Tucson once on 7/10/1928 flown by George Haldeman competing in the Ford Reliability Tour (Tour # 25) that summer. It wore NX4050 temporarily that July. No mention of why the man is running in the background.

Bellanca Model CH NC4050
Bellanca NC4050

Below, Lockheed Vega NC4097 which landed at Tucson on 7/10/1928 as a competitor in the Ford Reliability Tour (Tour #23). The pilot, Robert Cantwell, won the Tour that year. Please click to see below another Vega flown by Cantwell to victory in the National Air Races later this same year.

Lockheed Vega NC4097
Lockheed Vega NC4097

 

Below, Stearman NC5084 (Tour #6) flown by D.P. Levy. While this image is of the airplane on the ground at San Diego, it landed at Tucson somewhere between 5/27 and 5/29/1930 flown by A.L. Warrender.

Stearman NC5084
Stearman NC5084

Below, Buhl Airster NC5861 (Tour #7) landed at Tucson on 7/10/28 flown by Alger Graham. This image, again at San Diego, was taken a day later. Note "Baby Ruth", Tour #18, right next to it.

Buhl Airster NC5861
Buhl Airster NC5861

The "Baby Ruth", Waco NX5533, below, visited Tucson July 10, 1928 as a participant in the Ford Reliability Tour. It's pilot, John P. Wood, did not sign the Register on that date, but he did sign two other times, on 9/11 and 9/22/1928. He won the Reliability Tour. His visits in September were in conjunction with travel to and from the National Air Races held in Los Angeles, CA that year. In the cockpit appears to be Wood; the other gentleman is passenger Frank Clewers.

Waco NX5533 "Baby Ruth"
"Baby Ruth"

Below, Monocoupe NC5877 (Tour #29) flown to Tucson on 7/10/1928 by Phoebe Omlie.

Monocoupe NC5877
Monocoupe NC5877

Below, Stinson Detroiter SM1DA NC5900. This airplane visited Tucson with the Ford Reliability Tour (Tour #20) on July 10, 1928. It was flown by Eddie Stinson. Edward ('Eddie') Anderson Stinson, Jr., was born July 11, 1893, at Fort Payne, Alabama. He died as a result of an airplane crash near Chicago, Illinois, on 26 Jan 1932. This image was taken on the 11th in San Diego, CA. There is nothing in the NASM record for this airplane that would explain the "Barnsdale Corp." marking on the side of the airplane. However site visitor George Hobbs states that Barnsdale Production Company was a fairly important oil company in Oklahoma and other states. It was absorbed into Conoco, or Sun.

Stinson SM1DA NC5900
Stinson SM1DA NC5900

Below, Swallow NC6097 (Tour #17). This airplane landed at Tucson on 7/10/1928 with the rest of the Tour airplanes. It was flown by Mel Aavang, who wrote in the Remarks column of the Register, "National Air Tour" and "Beaucoup hot".

Swallow NC6097
Swallow NC6097

Below, Alexander Eaglerock A-4 NC6505 flown to Tucson 7/10/1928 by Cloyd Clevenger. It wore Tour #12. The Forden reference in the left sidebar lists this airplane as having a J-5 engine. It is a Hispano-Suiza.

Alexander Eaglerock A-4 NC6505
Alexander Eaglerock A-4 NC6505

Fokker F-10 NC5358 landed at Tucson on May 18, 1928. It was flown by pilot Hugh Wells and carried seven passengers. They noted in the Remarks column of the Register: "From Teterboro Airport, N.J. to Los Angeles, final destination.", "California Development Association Goodwill Tour, Plane No. 3", and "To San Francisco/ Western Air Express #3". Below are four excellent images that capture its visit that day.

Fokker F-10 NC5358
Fokker F-10 NC5358

 

Fokker F-10 NC5358, Front
Fokker F-10 NC5358

 

Fokker F-10 NC5358, Port Side
Fokker F-10 NC5358

 

Fokker F-10 NC5358, Starboard Side
Fokker F-10 NC5358

Below, the Goodyear Blimp NC-8-A. This aircraft did not land at Tucson, but its sister ship NC18A did land on 12/13/1931. It was westbound from Douglas, AZ to Los Angeles, CA. Date and location of this image are unknown.

If anyone knows anything about the date and location of this image, or about its sister ship NC18A, or the other Goodyear blimp identified simply as "1492" in the Register, please let me KNOW. There were five Goodyear Blimps that wore the number NC8A. Each was named Volunteer I to Volunteer V. This one, while named "Volunteer" on the lower rudder, does not have a Roman numeral after it. This photo could have been taken anytime over the decade 1928-39 when copies of NC8A were in operation.

Goodyear Blimp
Goodyear Blimp

Travel Air NC6455, flown to Tucson on 4/1/1929 by C.B. Cosgrove, Jr. Please see the airplane link for data written on the back of this image.

Travel Air NC6455
Travel Air NC6455

Below, Mohawk Pinto MLV NC7296 flown to Tucson on 0/26/1928 by H.M. O'Toole.

Mohawk Pinto MLV NC7296
Mohawk Pinto MLV NC7296

Below, Lockheed Vega NX7429 flown to Tucson three times during 1928 and 1929. This Vega is c/n 18 built on 8/27/1928. Painted yellow in this image, it was raced by Robert Cantwell in the 1928 National Air Races, plane #22, and won class C. Date and location of this image unknown, but clearly near the time of the Air Races.

Lockheed Vega NC7429
Lockheed Vega NC7429

Below, Lockheed Vega NC7953 flown to Tucson on 3/30/1929 by George Sherwood.

Lockheed Vega NC7953
Lockheed Vega NC7953

Below, Travel Air Model 4000 NC8192 flown to Tucson by Mildred Morgan on 9/19/1931. The airplane is s/n 894. It is still registered and is located in New Zealand. See this PDF download for information on this and other airplanes flown by female pilots to the Davis-Monthan Airfield that are still registered.

Travel Air Model 4000 NC8192
Travel Air Model 4000 NC8192

Below, Ryan B-5 NC9231 flown to Tucson on 10/21/1930 by B.M. Holmes. The person in the middle is identified as "probably" Clyde Tingley, Mayor of Albuquerque; the other two unidentified. Date and exact location undknown.

Ryan B-5 NC9231
Ryan B-5 NC9231

Below, Fairchild FC-2W2 NR8016. This airplane landed at Tucson five times between 1934 and 1936 as a work aircraft for the "Fairchild Aerial Surveys". It was piloted exclusively by Fritz Secor, with H.D. Treadway on the camera. They noted tersely in the Remarks column of the Register, "Aerial surveys".

Fairchild FC-2W2 NR8016
Fairchild FC-2W2 NR8016

Below, Ryan Brougham NS-15 flown to Tucson on 10/28/1928 by Gilbert Budwig.

Ryan NS-15
Ryan NS-15

Below, Ryan B-1 Brougham NX3598 flown to Tucson on 1/13/1928 by Al Henley.

Ryan B-1 Brougham NX3598
Ryan B-1 Brougham NX3598

Below, another view of NX3598 being serviced on the ground.

Ryan B-1 Brougham NX3598
NX3598

Below, another view of Ryan B-1 Brougham NX3598 on the ground.

Ryan B-1 Brougham NX3598
Ryan B-1 Brougham NX3598

Below, pilot Al Henley stands on the wheel of NX3598. Note the beautiful trademark "engine turned" finish of the Ryan's metal cowling. “Engine turning” is a term describing the overlapping circular effect caused by abrading the metal with a rotating wire brush or other abrasive.  It’s also called “perlage” (etymology is French for “partridge eye”) as illustrated here in a wrist watch. The process is sometimes mistakenly called "damascene". Some Ryan cowls did not have the pattern applied. And note the three writing instruments in Henley's pocket: typical pilot.

Ryan B-1 Brougham NX3598 With Al Henley
Ryan B-1 Brougham NX3598

Below, Lockheed Vega NX7440 flown to Tucson three times during 1928 and 1929 under both NX and NC registrations. It was piloted by William Brock and Robert E. Ellis. This airplane was manufactured 9/19/1928, c/n 20. It was the first Lockheed to fly in Europe in 1929.

Lockheed Vega NX7440
Lockheed Vega NX7440

These next eight unique images are of Ryan NX-211, the "Spirit of St. Louis" flown to Tucson September 23, 1927 by Charles Lindbergh. Lindbergh and the Spirit were on a Guggenheim-sponsored goodwill tour of the United States to boost aviation. They stayed in Tucson overnight, departing early the next morning. Compare these images with the ones exhibited at the links. There's also at the links a motion picture of the airplane and Lindbergh in the air and on the ground at Tucson.

This interesting vignetted image shows the Spirit probably being taxied into the hangar at Tucson for the night.

Ryan NX-211, the "Spirit of St. Louis"
Ryan NX-211, the "Spirit of St. Louis"

Below, the Spirit on the ground, probably at San Diego, CA before the trans-Atlantic flight.

Ryan NX-211, the "Spirit of St. Louis"
Ryan NX-211, the "Spirit of St. Louis"

Below, the Spirit on the ground at Tucson on the morning of September 24, 1927 shortly before takeoff for Lordsburg, NM. Compare this image with the one here. For a full motion picture image of this scene, as well as Lindbergh's other activities while in Tucson, follow this link. You'll find other motion picture films taken at Tucson at the link. Take some time to enjoy them all!

Ryan NX-211, the "Spirit of St. Louis"
Ryan NX-211, the "Spirit of St. Louis"

The Spirit was accompanied on its U.S. tour by a Department of Commerce Fairchild NS-7 seen at right in the image below. Phil Love, a friend of Lindbergh from air mail days, was the pilot of the Fairchild and is one of two other pilots to fly the Ryan NYP. The engine on the Spirit is running. You will also see the Fairchild in operation at the film link, above. The Fairchild is painted red; the "Spirit" silver.

Ryan NX-211, the "Spirit of St. Louis" & Fairchild NS-7
Ryan NX-211, the "Spirit of St. Louis" & Fairchild NS-7

Below, an image identified as being NX-211 under construction. However, it is actually a photo of a B-1. The seat frame welded into the forward area of the fusealge frame would not be a part of the "Spirit".  Because of the fuel tanks just behind the engine, the NYP design did not have any seats located in the forward section of the fuselage.

Unidentified Ryan Under Construction
Unidentified Ryan Under Construction

Below, the inside of the propeller spinner of the "Spirit of St. Louis" signed for good luck by members of Ryan Aircraft. Note that Douglas "Wrong Way" Corrigan is listed. He worked for Ryan during the construction of the Spirit.

Douglas Kelley signed the Register eight times as a pilot. He was test pilot for Ryan at the time of construction of "Spirit of St. Louis". The swastika is a good luck symbol in this context.

Ryan NX-211 Propeller Spinner
Ryan NX-211 Propeller Spinner

Below, two views of the instrument panel from the "Spirit of St. Louis".

Starboard View, Instrument Panel for NX-211, the "Spirit of St. Louis"
Instrument Panel for NX-211, the "Spirit of St. Louis"

Port side view, below, shows periscope deployed at left.

Port View, Instrument Panel for NX-211, the "Spirit of St. Louis"
Instrument Panel for NX-211, the "Spirit of St. Louis"

---o0o---

Back to top.

UPLOADED: 02/18/07 REVISED: 05/25/07, 02/01/08, 05/22/08, 05/12/09, 02/06/14

 
Home
The Register
People
Places
Airplanes
Events
PHOTO CREDITS AND PERMISSIONS

To use these photographs for any purpose, please contact their owner:

C.B. Cosgrove, III at 5555 Zuni Rd., SE, Suite 206, Albuquerque, NM 87106

 
Contact Us | Credits | Copyright © 2008 Delta Mike Airfield, Inc.
This website is best enjoyed in a 1024 x 768 screen resolution.
Web design by The Web Professional, Inc